News articles about dating violence etheopian women for dating


Domestic violence can involve psychological, verbal, sexual, or economic abuse.

Contributing to the isolation frequently experienced by victims, these forms of domestic violence can be difficult to spot.

Dating abuse ranks dead last on a list of topics parents most commonly discuss with their teens: school/grades (95%), money (90%), the economy (83%), family finances (78%), dating relationships (72%), alcohol (71%), drugs (71%), sex (64%) and dating abuse (31%). 52% of college students know someone in an abusive relationship yet only 8% see it as a major campus problem and many don’t intervene for the following reasons: think it will make the matter worse (62%), feel it is not their business (60%), think it will hurt their relationship with the victim (60%), they know the abuser (56%), and afraid the abuser might make their life more difficult (56%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

Teens that have witnessed violence within their own family are 50% more likely to be involved in an abusive relationship themselves. Violent relationships in formative years can have serious ramifications by putting the victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behaviors and further domestic violence. Dating Violence and Sexually Transmitted Disease/HIV Testing and Diagnosis Among Adolescent Females.

A new study from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions in New York finds that having a parent with an alcohol use disorder increases the risk for dating violence among teenagers.“Although teen dating violence is typically viewed as a problem related specifically to adolescent development, our findings indicate that the risk for aggressive behavior and involvement in dating violence are related to stressors experienced much earlier in life,” said researcher Jennifer A. Mothers living with partners who have alcohol use disorder tended to be more depressed and, as a result, were less warm and sensitive in their interactions with their children, beginning in infancy.“This is significant because children with warm and sensitive mothers are better able to regulate their emotions and behavior,” Livingston says.